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Interview with Detail CG Studio

Home > Designer Interviews > Detail CG Studio

Editor Frank Scott (FS) from DesignPRWire has interviewed designer Detail CG Studio (DCS) for A’ Design Award and Competition. You can access the full profile of Detail CG Studio by clicking here.

Interview with Detail CG Studio at Sunday 15th of May 2022
Paula Compte Santonja
FS: Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
DCS: Ever since I was a little girl, I have always loved building things. I was always trying to take things apart and put them back together, or building the "ideal house" where my "playmobil" would live. So, later on, I decided to study product design. Although in the process I realized that what I liked the most, was to represent my designs or the designs of others through computer programs. It was a world without barriers in which you could design or represent anything regardless of its price, its materials or its manufacturing process. There were no limitations.

FS: Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
DCS: We are specialized in creating high quality CG photography for retail, real state or hospitality. We help interior designers, architects, art directors, etc. to communicate the qualities of their project through colors, textures, lights and shadows, capturing even the smallest detail that the client wants to show.

FS: What is "design" for you?
DCS: To me, design is a process of mental configuration, in the search for a creative solution in any field. It can be the means to change things. Improving society and making it evolve without leaving our planet behind.

FS: What kinds of works do you like designing most?
DCS: I enjoy the projects of retail, real state or hospitality.

FS: What is your most favorite design, could you please tell more about it?
DCS: Possibly "Santa Monica Proper" by Kelly Wearstler. I couldn't decide on a project by this wonderful designer. What inspires me most about her designs is her ability to combine pieces and that each photograph is thought out in detail to create a perfect composition. My amazement never ceases.

FS: What was the first thing you designed for a company?
DCS: My first internship in a company was at Royo Group. A bathroom furniture company in Valencia, for which I had the opportunity to design a washbasin and a bathroom cabinet and an organization system for its drawers. Although it has not so much to do with what I do now, I really enjoyed the whole process and the opportunity I had to work with the designers of that company.

FS: What is your favorite material / platform / technology?
DCS: The truth is that everything related to CGI. We work with 3dstudio max and corona render, but there are more and more software, plugins and programs that help us to work in this industry and that facilitate the processes in an unimaginable way and are also compatible with these programs. I couldn't choose just one.

FS: When do you feel the most creative?
DCS: In the morning, after a walk with my dog, when all the noise of the previous day has faded away.

FS: Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?
DCS: To achieve realistic images and at the same time have the aesthetics that the client is looking for, it seems important to us to focus on all phases of the process. For us it is very important the initial modeling of the furniture and the space. We put a lot of detail into it and I think that is reflected in the final result. But without focusing on making the materials physically correct and working the lighting to achieve the mood desired by the client, the previous efforts will be useless.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
DCS: The world is full of problems and stresses of everyday life, but for me, immersing myself in the computer program, creating non-existent projects, is an escape from all the contrasting emotions of every day.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when your designs are realized?
DCS: The satisfaction of knowing that a client has been able to realize his project in part thanks to my photographs.

FS: What makes a design successful?
DCS: For me, a balance between aesthetics and functionality.

FS: When judging a design as good or bad, which aspects do you consider first?
DCS: In the current framework, I would first consider the design to be environmentally friendly.

FS: From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
DCS: I think the environment is the most important thing right now. In my life I have worked for many architecture and design firms and I got tired of seeing an impressive villa being built on a virgin island in the middle of a beautiful landscape, without stopping to recapitulate what that entails. We advocate a circular economy in which we tend to reuse things in disuse, abandoned or oldI think there are many old houses and it would take us a lifetime to redesign those old cos, before occupying those spaces, which belong to the animals. I am not saying that it is not being done, but there are millions of projects that perfectly integrate the houses in the environment that collects them, and it seems to me that this is the way to go.

FS: How do you think the "design field" is evolving? What is the future of design?
DCS: Luckily, I am reading numerous articles where newly created, environmentally friendly materials are discussed and shown. Fortunately, I believe that this will be the future of design, and I also believe that it could not be otherwise.

FS: When was your last exhibition and where was it? And when do you want to hold your next exhibition?
DCS: I haven't done any exhibits, sorry

FS: Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
DCS: I subscribe to 3 traditional magazines that come to me monthly and to which I dedicate a few hours a week, to keep up to date with the news. In addition, I am also interested in a few design blogs, such as SightUnseen, Yellowtrace, Dezeen, Designboom. And I spend more hours than I would like to admit by reviewing the professional instagram of designers or design studios I admire, such as Kelly Wearstler, DimoreStudio, NicoleHollis, etc. I think the best way to learn and grow professionally is to soak up the work of designers who are better than you, and that's what I try to do in my day to day life.

FS: How would you describe your design style? What made you explore more this style and what are the main characteristics of your style? What's your approach to design?
DCS: I think I don't have a specific style. I try to approach the style and mood that my client needs to show his project and I adapt to each situation.

FS: Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
DCS: I live in Valencia, Spain. I think everything around me affects my designs. Both my family and friends' life and my city and my surroundings. What I like most about Valencia is the good weather, almost every day there are long hours of sunshine, which inspires you to go out and enjoy the weather. And we are lucky to be able to enjoy both the beach and the mountains. So this opens a window to creativity. In addition, this year, Valencia has been selected by the World Design Organization as the World Capital of Design. And this brings us closer to cultural and design events like we've never had before.

FS: How do you work with companies?
DCS: I accompany interior design, architecture and design companies during their design process, providing photographs and helping them in the decision making process, making the architectural and material changes they want at all times.

FS: What are your suggestions to companies for working with a designer? How can companies select a good designer?
DCS: In our case, we will talk about how companies can hire a good 3D visualization studio. Being a 3D artist and also an architect, interior designer, or designer as in our case, allows to reach a better communication and understanding with the technical vocabulary, but that does not mean that all renderers who make 3D have knowledge of architecture, interior design and design, since the function of 3D computer graphics is not to design architecturally or execute a work, but its function and knowledge are based on 3D modeling techniques, lighting and photography. It is important to take this point into account because, if the 3D visualization studio is not specialized in design, it is possible that the interpretation of plans and materials is not correct, leading to delays in the project deadline. In addition, having knowledge related to design helps to improve the aesthetics of the project.

FS: Can you talk a little about your design process?
DCS: When we make a 3D visualization for a client the first thing we do is to review the information sent to us and look for references to help us create the mood and lighting that the client wants. The first phase will be the "Modeling" phase. We will model the space and the furniture in 3D and make a first render with all the objects in white and a basic lighting. In this way, the client can focus on seeing the general volumes and correct from the design department if any piece of furniture does not fit or if they want to redesign any element of the architecture. The next phase will be "Texturing & Lighting". We will study in depth the lighting that will look best for that project and the creation of all the materials. We usually make all the materials from scratch for each new project, so that each project is unique. In this phase, the client will focus on changing the materials he/she considers necessary and assessing the mood of the image. The last two phases will be "Props & Refinement" and "Final render & Postproduction".

FS: What are 5 of your favorite design items at home?
DCS: Oblique Round Dining Table by Kelly Wearstler Fairfax Chair - Right Hand Facing by Kelly Wearstler Woolgathering Armchair by Michal Cihlar Design The Andrea & Alex collection by Mascreations Sofa DS-600 by De Sede

FS: Can you describe a day in your life?
DCS: During the week, the first thing I do when I wake up is to take a walk with my dog. When I get back, I make myself a cup of coffee and quietly check my email and the subscriptions to the magazines I like. Then, I connect with my team and we start the project we have been asked to do at that moment. We take an hour break for lunch and a short walk with my dog and in the afternoon, while the team continues with the project, I dedicate myself to the management tasks of the company. Once the workday is over, and depending on the day, I do a little sport or resume some of the courses I am doing. And I enjoy the rest of the day with my family.

FS: Could you please share some pearls of wisdom for young designers? What are your suggestions to young, up and coming designers?
DCS: I don't think I am the right person to give "pearls of wisdom". I try to go day by day facing challenges one by one. And I keep training myself to one day have those "pearls". I would tell them not to be in a hurry, to enjoy the process and to train and make the most of these stages of continuous training, which they miss later on. Above all, humility and work ethic.

FS: From your perspective, what would you say are some positives and negatives of being a designer?
DCS: It is a job that requires a lot of mental effort and many hours, because sometimes the creativity does not come when your client needs it, and you have to work more hours until you get the results you want. But it is very rewarding to have a job where you can experiment during the process and grow, creatively speaking, with each assignment.

FS: What is your "golden rule" in design?
DCS: References. For CG Artists, I think the most important thing is to have good real references for materials, lighting, etc. I would never advise referencing from other CG Artists (which doesn't mean that you don't look at other artist's work). I mean referencing from reality.

FS: What skills are most important for a designer?
DCS: To be decisive and to know how to adapt to each project and each client.

FS: Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application, hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?
DCS: To make the 3D Infographics we use 3D Studio Max and Corona Render. To facilitate and minimize some tasks within 3D Studio Max, we use some scripts and plugins such as: GrowFX, ForestPack, RailClone, RizomUV, FloorGenerator, ProyectManager, Pulze, among others. To work with textures we use software such as Pixplant, Substance 3D Textures Pack, Photoshop, among others. As for work organization, we really like to use Notion for project and company management. And for client work, we find it very easy to work using the Ftrack Review application.

FS: Designing can sometimes be a really time consuming task, how do you manage your time?
DCS: Thanks to my team. Without them it would not be possible to carry out all the projects.

FS: How long does it take to design an object from beginning to end?
DCS: In my case, I will talk about 3D Infographics. The time it takes to make an image depends a lot on each project. The minimum could be a week (taking into account that in our studio we work the projects in 4 phases and between each one of them there is a correction by the client).

FS: What is the most frequently asked question to you, as a designer?
DCS: How do you make 3d infographics look like real photographs?

FS: What was your most important job experience?
DCS: Working in other 3D studios, before opening my own company, where I had the opportunity to work for companies such as Kettal, Foster+Partners, Katty Shibeck, Sabina States, Rockwell Group, Rapt Studio, Porcelanosa, Avroko, Meyer Davis, Nicole Hollis, East West Partners, Ken Fulk, among others, making renderings for catalogs and interior design projects.

FS: Who are some of your clients?
DCS: I can't talk about that at the moment. We are a startup, and we opened recently. The projects we have done are still confidential.

FS: What type of design work do you enjoy the most and why?
DCS: I enjoy the projects of retail, real state or hospitality for large clients more because they take more time to make design decisions and I can enjoy the process much better.

FS: What are your future plans? What is next for you?
DCS: As I said, we are a startup. I have no plans for the future. I hope to be able to say that clients keep coming in and the company continues to grow and operate for many years and above all that the clients are satisfied with our work, which is important.

FS: Do you work as a team, or do you develop your designs yourself?
DCS: We work as a team.

FS: Do you have any works-in-progress being designed that you would like to talk about?
DCS: As I said, it is confidential right now, sorry for the inconvenience.

FS: How can people contact you?
DCS: Les dejo nuestra página web: www.detailcgstudio.com where you can write us through the contact form or you can write an email directly to contact@detailcgstudio.com.

FS: Any other things you would like to cover that have not been covered in these questions?
DCS: Nothing more to add, thank you


FS: Thank you for providing us with this opportunity to interview you.

A’ Design Award and Competitions grants rights to press members and bloggers to use parts of this interview. This interview is provided as it is; DesignPRWire and A' Design Award and Competitions cannot be held responsible for the answers given by participating designers.


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