THE AWARD
CATEGORIES
REGISTRATION
SUBMIT YOUR WORK
ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS
TERMS & CONDITIONS
PUBLICATIONS
DATES & FEES
METHODOLOGY
CONTACT
WINNERS
PRESS ROOM
GET INVOLVED
DESIGN PRIZE
DESIGN STORE
 
THE AWARD | JURY | CATEGORIES | REGISTRATION | PRESS | WINNERS | PUBLICATIONS | ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS

Interview with Vassili Tselebidis

Home > Designer Interviews > Vassili Tselebidis

Editor Frank Scott (FS) from DesignPRWire has interviewed designer Vassili Tselebidis (VT) for A’ Design Award and Competition. You can access the full profile of Vassili Tselebidis by clicking here.

Interview with Vassili Tselebidis at Wednesday 13th of May 2020
Vassili Tselebidis
FS: Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
VT: I’ve always wanted to do something in the creative field. As long as I remember, I’ve always been a creative soul. Unfortunately, like many children around the world, we are pressured by our creators to respect what they have envisioned for us. I began to consider my desires when I decided to live my true self and stop hiding behind cultural or religious beliefs. And I fully committed to it when I was selected by Pascaline Smets to be featured at the Smets Young Talents 2015. During this event that promotes young designers, I presented my first graphic designs and I decided to materialize three of them through fine jewelry. My work then attracted the attention of the plastic arts department of the Wallonia-Brussels Federation and thanks to the prototyping aid that has been granted to me, I was able to produce the prototypes of my first collection in the course of 2018.

FS: What is "design" for you?
VT: Design is a lifestyle for me. I style my life in its every aspect and I envision every single detail of it. Design is part of my daily routine on many levels.

FS: What kinds of works do you like designing most?
VT: Everything from jewelry to leather goods to furniture. And it goes on.

FS: What was the first thing you designed for a company?
VT: A removable display unit for a well-known commercial mall in Brussels.

FS: What is your favorite material / platform / technology?
VT: Gold alloys. These are a reflection of sumptuousness and generosity, but also prosperity. A piece of fine jewelry has usually a strong symbolic significance and can be a testimony to life's highlights. I attach great importance to materials in general.

FS: When do you feel the most creative?
VT: There is no specific time really because as a creative soul you have to keep on giving but I have to say that I feel the most comfortable and creative when the night comes because it slows down time. I feel alone and in charge.

FS: Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?
VT: As a first step, the original aspect of my design. I often ask myself “Am I bringing something new on the table?” Afterward, I focus on practicality and quality. I want to create products that will be part of people's lives for quite some time.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
VT: I feel all kinds of emotions. It goes from frustration to satisfaction and all of the above.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when your designs are realized?
VT: I feel on top of the world and like everything is possible. It always seems impossible until it’s done. I believe Nelson Mandela said that.

FS: What makes a design successful?
VT: I think there’s no clue for success. As a creative soul, you just try to think out of the box, to be different and original, and potentially, success will come along and be part of your legacy.

FS: When judging a design as good or bad, which aspects do you consider first?
VT: The originality of the overall design and attention to detail. I do ask myself “Is this déjà-vu?”

FS: From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
VT: To be more concerned in general. Now that the world is facing an unprecedented crisis, we all start to understand that it is time to slow down and make things the right way. We have to educate each other to understand that good design takes time and be more considerate to those around us and what surrounds us.

FS: How do you think the "design field" is evolving? What is the future of design?
VT: I think the design field is becoming more aware of the needs of its creativity. It takes time to design and conceptualize. We think that we have to perpetually put things on the market to be relevant. But it doesn’t make sense anymore because there are too many things happening in a short amount of time. The future is now and we are already experiencing changes. I think of Jean-Paul Gaultier who has decided to follow an upcycling approach of Haute Couture or Saint Laurent who has announced that they will evolve at their own pace from now on. The frenetic speed that these powerhouses were somehow obliged to respect was not durable and now Mother Nature reminds us of that in some way. There was too much pressure for too many years and it affected us all.

FS: Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
VT: Usually, designers say that they are inspired by everything that surrounds them. I find it very cliché to say but that is the truth. Inspiration may come from anything. An emotion, an encounter, or even some dust on a shiny cosmetic jar that inspires you a pattern for example. As a designer, you pay attention to everything and especially to tiny little details that most of the people won’t see.

FS: How would you describe your design style? What made you explore more this style and what are the main characteristics of your style? What's your approach to design?
VT: I don't have a particular style, I have a sense of taste in general. Whether it is good or bad, it is eclectic above all. Through Ambroise Vassili, I would like to express different styles and their aesthetics. I do not aspire to find a signature silhouette but more of a set of details that signs my silhouette. Fine jewelry was for me the best way to do so.

FS: Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
VT: I live in Brussels. I won’t say that the cultural heritage of Belgium affects or inspires my designs. Even though I was born and raised in Brussels, my Greek heritage as affected me and still does much more because there’s nostalgia linked to it.

FS: What are 5 of your favorite design items at home?
VT: These are objects that were gifted to me or belonged to people dear to my heart. If I had to list five of them I would say; a framed collage artwork gifted to me for my birthday, a vintage Omega watch in yellow gold and stainless steel, a yellow gold signet ring set with an emerald-cut sapphire and brilliant-cut diamonds, a balmacaan overcoat made of virgin wool and camel hair and an elephant-shaped wooden sculpture.

FS: From your perspective, what would you say are some positives and negatives of being a designer?
VT: The most positive aspect of being a creative soul is that it makes you rethink everything that surrounds you, anywhere and anytime. You get yourself stuck in a mind game that can be challenging sometimes, of course, but that brings you so much fulfillment at the end of the journey. As for a negative aspect, I would say that it is indeed time-consuming. It's a beautiful thing when someone's career and passion come together but many sacrifices have to be taken in order to accomplish that.

FS: What is your "golden rule" in design?
VT: To let my imagination envision and worry about nothing else but being creative. There’s always room for improvements and adjustments in a second phase.

FS: Designing can sometimes be a really time consuming task, how do you manage your time?
VT: I have been single for five years, I guess I can’t manage my time. Jokes aside. I try not to pack a whole lot in one day, to schedule and prioritize even though it can be challenging sometimes. I try not to be too harsh on myself because design takes time anyway. But if I have to and it happened more than once, I won't hesitate to burn the midnight oil.

FS: What are your future plans? What is next for you?
VT: First of all, the next step for me is to make a business out of my talent. And to do that I need to expand my network and find the right investors and collaborators. Then, the short-term goal is to launch new designs that will be compatible with the current pieces. The number of combinations and the freedom of creation will, therefore, be increased. The second goal will be to complete the first collection with necklaces, bangles, and earrings while remaining the spirit of the original concept. The most successful designs will continue to be declined to offer some new combinations to the customers. Mainly thanks to new gold alloys: such as blue, black, green, or purple gold. Some new cut or cabochon gems, such as sapphire, ruby, emerald, opal, lapis-lazuli or malachite will be added as well. In terms of creative direction, it will be essential to diversify myself by continuing to develop the concept of interlocking but also, by presenting new collections independent from it but always based on the emblem. In the long run, I also have the ambition to diversify my brand's product portfolio.

FS: Do you work as a team, or do you develop your designs yourself?
VT: I develop my designs myself but I would love to collaborate more. I am very human-oriented. I like to share experiences, build memories, and learn from others.

FS: Do you have any works-in-progress being designed that you would like to talk about?
VT: Leather goods. I am self-taught in leather craft and being able to materialize my designs by myself is very satisfying. It is the only way to understand and appreciate the work and know-how of craftsmanship. When you are creative and qualified nothing can stop you, you can rule the world.

FS: How can people contact you?
VT: People can reach out to me by email at hello@ambroisevassili.com and I’ll be happy to answer.


FS: Thank you for providing us with this opportunity to interview you.

A’ Design Award and Competitions grants rights to press members and bloggers to use parts of this interview. This interview is provided as it is; DesignPRWire and A' Design Award and Competitions cannot be held responsible for the answers given by participating designers.


Press Members: Register and login to request a custom interview with Vassili Tselebidis.
SOCIAL
+ Add to Likes / Favorites | Send to My Email | Submit Comment | Comment | Testimonials
 
design award logo

BENEFITS
THE DESIGN PRIZE
WINNERS SERVICES
PR CAMPAIGN
PRESS RELEASE
MEDIA CAMPAIGNS
AWARD TROPHY
AWARD CERTIFICATE
AWARD WINNER LOGO
PRIME DESIGN MARK
BUY & SELL DESIGN
DESIGN BUSINESS NETWORK
AWARD SUPPLEMENT

METHODOLOGY
DESIGN AWARD JURY
PRELIMINARY SCORE
VOTING SYSTEM
EVALUATION CRITERIA
METHODOLOGY
BENEFITS FOR WINNERS
PRIVACY POLICY
ELIGIBILITY
FEEDBACK
WINNERS' MANUAL
PROOF OF CREATION
WINNER KIT CONTENTS
FAIR JUDGING
AWARD YEARBOOK
AWARD GALA NIGHT
AWARD EXHIBITION

MAKING AN ENTRY
ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS
REGISTRATION
ALL CATEGORIES

FEES & DATES
FURTHER FEES POLICY
MAKING A PAYMENT
PAYMENT METHODS
DATES & FEES

TRENDS & REPORTS
DESIGN TRENDS
DESIGNER REPORTS
DESIGNER PROFILES
DESIGN INTERVIEWS

ABOUT
THE AWARD
AWARD IN NUMBERS
HOMEPAGE
AWARD WINNING DESIGNS
DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
MUSEUM OF DESIGN
PRIME CLUBS
SITEMAP
RESOURCE

RANKINGS
DESIGNER RANKINGS
WORLD DESIGN RANKINGS
DESIGN CLASSIFICATIONS
POPULAR DESIGNERS

CORPORATE
GET INVOLVED
SPONSOR AN AWARD
BENEFITS FOR SPONSORS

PRESS
DOWNLOADS
PRESS-KITS
PRESS PORTAL
LIST OF WINNERS
PUBLICATIONS
RANKINGS
CALL FOR ENTRIES
RESULTS ANNOUNCEMENT

CONTACT US
CONTACT US
GET SUPPORT

Follow us : Twitter Twitter | Twitter Facebook | Twitter Google+.
Share |