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Interview with Salvita Bingelyte

Home > Designer Interviews > Salvita Bingelyte

Editor Frank Scott (FS) from DesignPRWire has interviewed designer Salvita Bingelyte (SB) for A’ Design Award and Competition. You can access the full profile of Salvita Bingelyte by clicking here.

Interview with Salvita Bingelyte at Monday 20th of August 2018

FS: Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
SB: Creativity runs in my mother’s side of the family. Therefore, I’ve always had a passion for art since my childhood. And now, I live and breath graphic design. It is my lifestyle. I studied graphic design at the Vilnius Academy of Arts. I actually started my career as a graphic designer while still a student, working for agencies and other large companies.

FS: Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
SB: In 2010, I started a freelance design studio, Salvita Design. Currently, we are two designers, but are in the process of expanding. I dedicate myself to every project and always try to see through the eyes the customer. I’m interested in long-term projects because I care about every aspect of the process including how well the products are selling, customers’ reactions and feedback as well as room for improvements. I encourage my clients to think outside the box, by doing so, we push each other and grow together. I care about every aspect of the process and beyond. For me, there is never an end to a project.

FS: What is "design" for you?
SB: Design not only has to be beautiful, but practical. You should never mislead the customer, making them believe they’re getting something they’re not. The design should also always be realistic and straight forward: easy to read, easy to understand, easy to use. People lead busy lives and don’t always have time for reading instructions or finding out how to open a package.

FS: What kinds of works do you like designing most?
SB: I particularly enjoy designing packaging, branding and print design. For me, it's always challenging and helps me grow as a designer.

FS: What is your most favorite design, could you please tell more about it?
SB: One of my recent projects, “The Mood”, has quickly gained popularity with customers in the market place as well as receiving global attention in the design community. This project was to create branding and packaging for an International coffee company’s single origin, premium Arabica beans. The goal was to appeal to a new generation of coffee drinkers: hipsters with old school style and a little extra money in their back pocket, interested in the complex flavors of coffee, similar to a fine wine or craft beer. To attract their attention, the design showcases five different hand drawn, vintage inspired and slightly realistic monkey faces, each one representing a different coffee from a different region. On their head, a stylish, classic hat. These dapper monkeys imply quality and sophistication, exactly what our target market is looking for.The memorable monkey faces can easily transpose to products like tea and chocolate as well as marketing items such as t-shirts and mugs, making everything cohesive.

FS: What was the first thing you designed for a company?
SB: It was a logotype for a hotel spa. They loved it because they're still using it now, 15 years later.

FS: What is your favorite material / platform / technology?
SB: I love Instagram. I can tell my story, my life, the way I see the world...visually.

FS: When do you feel the most creative?
SB: Music is my muse, especially classical.

FS: Which aspects of a design do you focus more during designing?
SB: Aesthetics first, then uniqueness and practicality.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
SB: I feel overflowing with energy, fully charged.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when your designs are realized?
SB: For me, it is most fulfilling to know that a brand I created is well received and popular in the marketplace.

FS: What makes a design successful?
SB: When people are talking about it and remember it.

FS: When judging a design as good or bad, which aspects do you consider first?
SB: Synergy between fonts, layouts and illustrations is key to a great design.

FS: From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
SB: Our responsibility is to create a more beautiful world that does not violate anyone's rights and does not harm the environment.

FS: How do you think the "design field" is evolving? What is the future of design?
SB: It’s nice to see that graphic design and packaging is becoming simpler and more refined.

FS: When was your last exhibition and where was it? And when do you want to hold your next exhibition?
SB: I have yet to hold an exhibition, but I'm ready.

FS: Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
SB: Music is my main inspiration. I often go to classical music concerts. During a concert, many beautiful ideas are born. When it comes to concentrating and generating ideas, I always listen to Mozart, Čiurlionis or Merula.

FS: How would you describe your design style? What made you explore more this style and what are the main characteristics of your style? What's your approach to design?
SB: My design style is modern classic with an aesthetic angle.

FS: Where do you live? Do you feel the cultural heritage of your country affects your designs? What are the pros and cons during designing as a result of living in your country?
SB: I’ve always dreamed of having my own creative agency, but I was afraid to take the steps to get there. Lithuanian modesty, a result of the Soviet Union, prevents you from standing out from the crowd. I’m from this Soviet generation where individuality wasn’t encouraged, but actually discouraged. This way of thinking left a deep impression upon me. However, I’ve overcome this obstacle and my time has come. I’m confident with lots of experience, energy and a desire to grow.

FS: How do you work with companies?
SB: As in personal relationships, I believe that mutual trust is key in client relationships. I dedicate myself to every project and always try to see through the eyes the customer. I’m interested in long-term projects because I care about every aspect of the process including how well the products are selling, customers’ reactions and feedback as well as room for improvements. I encourage my clients to think outside the box, by doing so, we push each other and grow together. Design is organic and always changing. The client knows they can count on me, now and in five years from now.

FS: What are your suggestions to companies for working with a designer? How can companies select a good designer?
SB: Find a designer whose portfolio you like and then trust their capabilities, experience and talent. The more information you provide, the faster you'll get the results you want.

FS: Can you talk a little about your design process?
SB: First of all, I always keep up on market research and trends. I want to make sure my design work always stands out from the crowd. With that in mind, I identify my client's needs, start the creative process, show them the design work, collect feedback and the final version.

FS: What are 5 of your favorite design items at home?
SB: iMac, green chair, handmade carpet, glass vase, Novum magazine

FS: Can you describe a day in your life?
SB: It is hard to describe, every day is different, because I do not like monotony. I'm searching for something new all the time.

FS: Could you please share some pearls of wisdom for young designers? What are your suggestions to young, up and coming designers?
SB: Be patient, stand out and dream big.

FS: From your perspective, what would you say are some positives and negatives of being a designer?
SB: Positive: creative work is interesting and fun, your work can be seen worldwide, you can work anywhere in the world, work for yourself or on a team. Negative: If you are a freelancer, you do not have financial stability and you must be a designer, manager, seller and accountant all in one.

FS: What is your "golden rule" in design?
SB: Listen to your customer.

FS: What skills are most important for a designer?
SB: To be on time. Ahead of schedule is even better.

FS: Which tools do you use during design? What is inside your toolbox? Such as software, application, hardware, books, sources of inspiration etc.?
SB: I use Mac computer, camera, mobile phone, Adobe programs. Sources of inspiration: Instagram, Pinterest, magazines, travelling, music.

FS: Designing can sometimes be a really time consuming task, how do you manage your time?
SB: It's a secret.

FS: How long does it take to design an object from beginning to end?
SB: It depends on the project. Usually 3-6 months. The longest project lasted a year.

FS: What is the most frequently asked question to you, as a designer?
SB: What are your inspirations?

FS: What was your most important job experience?
SB: One of my recent projects, “The Mood” coffee packaging.

FS: Who are some of your clients?
SB: My clients range from small companies to large corporations, locally and abroad. I have a great passion for cooking, maybe that’s why I have many clients from the food and beverage industry.

FS: What type of design work do you enjoy the most and why?
SB: I like complicated work, which challenges me to grow.

FS: What are your future plans? What is next for you?
SB: My goal is to be an international design studio focusing on visual content that is simple but innovative with a long lasting value for clients.

FS: Do you work as a team, or do you develop your designs yourself?
SB: Currently, we are two designers, but are in the process of expanding.

FS: Do you have any works-in-progress being designed that you would like to talk about?
SB: Not yet.

FS: How can people contact you?
SB: By e-mail or phone.


FS: Thank you for providing us with this opportunity to interview you.

A’ Design Award and Competitions grants rights to press members and bloggers to use parts of this interview. This interview is provided as it is; DesignPRWire and A' Design Award and Competitions cannot be held responsible for the answers given by participating designers.


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