THE AWARD
CATEGORIES
REGISTRATION
SUBMIT YOUR WORK
ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS
TERMS & CONDITIONS
PUBLICATIONS
DATES & FEES
METHODOLOGY
CONTACT
WINNERS
PRESS ROOM
GET INVOLVED
DESIGN PRIZE
DESIGN STORE
 
THE AWARD | JURY | CATEGORIES | REGISTRATION | PRESS | WINNERS | PUBLICATIONS | ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS

Interview with Christine Oehme

Home > Designer Interviews > Christine Oehme

Editor Frank Scott (FS) from DesignPRWire has interviewed designer Christine Oehme (CO) for A’ Design Award and Competition. You can access the full profile of Christine Oehme by clicking here.

Interview with Christine Oehme at Thursday 25th of March 2021
Christine Oehme
FS: Could you please tell us more about your art and design background? What made you become an artist/designer? Have you always wanted to be a designer?
CO: I recently graduated from the University of Arts in Berlin, where I have studied product design for six years. I have always been a creative kid, my mom always told me that I wanted to try out everything, so I got a weaving loom, a tiny easel for the desk, I even got interested in that old-school lace-making.

FS: Can you tell us more about your company / design studio?
CO: I recently graduated from the University of Arts in Berlin, where I have studied product design for six years. I have always been a creative kid, my mom always told me that I wanted to try out everything, so I got a weaving loom, a tiny easel for the desk, I even got interested in that old-school lace-making.

FS: What is "design" for you?
CO: For me, design means creating: in all forms. Be it with your hands or think through big, free, absurd ideas and thoughts in a playful way. Design has the potential to change norms and create new perspectives.

FS: When do you feel the most creative?
CO: That has changed a lot in the last few years. Since I became a mom, every free time, as soon as I'm in the studio, has been a good and creative time. Since then I have loved working alone in a room, when I draw and build models I like to listen to loud music or podcasts. Then I'm incredibly focused.

FS: What kind of emotions do you feel when you design?
CO: oh so many different! The design process is constantly changing and I feel just as many emotions. When I have a good drive, I am infinitely energetic and happy. I am very patient with myself and trust that at the end of the feeling, something great will come out of it.

FS: From your point of view, what are the responsibilities of a designer for society and environment?
CO: We are responsible for how the world around us, the objects, rooms or, for example, the development of digital services develop. We don't just design beautiful, empty shells, but a mutually dependent network of interactions. And that includes, for example, which materials or manufacturing methods are used and what consumers perceive to be familiar.

FS: Where does the design inspiration for your works come from? How do you feed your creativity? What are your sources of inspirations?
CO: My inspiration comes from everyday life. Especially with children you are always changing and watch this with amazement and overwhelm. You're always looking for things that work well and look beautiful at the same time. The playground is not only my daily destination, but also observation and exchange with other parents. It's amazing how much inspiration you can take from it.

FS: Can you talk a little about your design process?
CO: Even if I draw inspiration and ideas from my own experience, I try to back them up with research. To do this, I read studies and books, speak to experts who have in-depth knowledge or experience. This foundation helps me a lot in developing ideas and embedding my design. This is followed by several loops of drawing, building models, material research. It is always important to me to get into the material quickly and to try things out in the workshop. I also test my object on the user to get feedback. And anyway, I find the exchange with other designers very important and inspiring. When I implement my design on the computer, I always have a sheet of paper in front of me. These are probably the least beautiful, but all the more helpful sketches.

FS: What are 5 of your favorite design items at home?
CO: A mixture of old and homemade things. For example a cabinet from GDR times, with a new color and feet on the bottom, it is beautiful. We also have a wooden sewing box on roll legs from the estate of an old lady. The game stone from present stories from Berlin is a great toy and at the same time geometric furniture.

FS: Can you describe a day in your life?
CO: I graduated at the end of last year and since then Corona has messed up our everyday lives. In fact, I spent a lot of time with my child. When my partner is at home, we split up the day. Then I have two to four hours to be creative or just work through my to-dos. But on days when my partner is working as a cameraman, my productive part doesn't start until after 9 p.m. And then you can imagine how creative I am sometimes.

FS: What was your most important job experience?
CO: During my studies, I worked part-time at bartmann berlin, an interior design studio, and later at the Center for Responsible Research and Innovation at the Fraunhofer Institute. This time was infinitely valuable for me to combine the rather free work and life at the university with the challenges of everyday work. I learned a lot during this time, for example I organized and led two workshops on my own responsibility. This work experience gives me a lot of security to get started in the design world.

FS: What type of design work do you enjoy the most and why?
CO: I love to draw freely and to get into the creative flow. On the other hand, I'm totally into digitalizing the design and bringing all the puzzle pieces together.

FS: Do you have any works-in-progress being designed that you would like to talk about?
CO: I am currently designing a piece of shelving for children, which should support them in their independence. Children often do not want to tidy up, but the natural urge to sort things and put them in and out on their own is very great. A carpenter friend will build this design

FS: How can people contact you?
CO: Via email or instagram. Email: oehmechristine@gmail.com Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/christine.oehme/

FS: Any other things you would like to cover that have not been covered in these questions?
CO: How did you come to deal with gender-sensitive design for children? I became a mom in the middle of my product design studies. The time at home was the most beautiful and at the same time the most challenging time ever. Above all, I saw myself confronted with social expectations and the pressures of being a mother. And noticed very quickly: Gender norms not only apply to me and my partner, but are also expressed to my son. For example through language, but also gender-specific advertising of food or the design of toys. The strong separation between action heroes and dolls, pink and blue or brave and dear is predominant in the toy departments. In this way, an image is conveyed from birth on what is female and male, how one should behave as a man or woman. Why do you speak of gender-sensitive design and not gender-neutral design? Gender is never neutral because there is no gender neutral reality. And that's why it's important to me that design cannot be neutral or objective. It is rather important that we deal with the powerful category of gender and consciously deal with history, stereotypes and design norms and steer against them.


FS: Thank you for providing us with this opportunity to interview you.

A’ Design Award and Competitions grants rights to press members and bloggers to use parts of this interview. This interview is provided as it is; DesignPRWire and A' Design Award and Competitions cannot be held responsible for the answers given by participating designers.


Press Members: Register and login to request a custom interview with Christine Oehme.
SOCIAL
+ Add to Likes / Favorites | Send to My Email | Submit Comment | Comment | Testimonials
 
design award logo

BENEFITS
THE DESIGN PRIZE
WINNERS SERVICES
PR CAMPAIGN
PRESS RELEASE
MEDIA CAMPAIGNS
AWARD TROPHY
AWARD CERTIFICATE
AWARD WINNER LOGO
PRIME DESIGN MARK
BUY & SELL DESIGN
DESIGN BUSINESS NETWORK
AWARD SUPPLEMENT

METHODOLOGY
DESIGN AWARD JURY
PRELIMINARY SCORE
VOTING SYSTEM
EVALUATION CRITERIA
METHODOLOGY
BENEFITS FOR WINNERS
PRIVACY POLICY
ELIGIBILITY
FEEDBACK
WINNERS' MANUAL
PROOF OF CREATION
WINNER KIT CONTENTS
FAIR JUDGING
AWARD YEARBOOK
AWARD GALA NIGHT
AWARD EXHIBITION

MAKING AN ENTRY
ENTRY INSTRUCTIONS
REGISTRATION
ALL CATEGORIES

FEES & DATES
FURTHER FEES POLICY
MAKING A PAYMENT
PAYMENT METHODS
DATES & FEES

TRENDS & REPORTS
DESIGN TRENDS
DESIGNER REPORTS
DESIGNER PROFILES
DESIGN INTERVIEWS

ABOUT
THE AWARD
AWARD IN NUMBERS
HOMEPAGE
AWARD WINNING DESIGNS
DESIGNER OF THE YEAR
MUSEUM OF DESIGN
PRIME CLUBS
SITEMAP
RESOURCE

RANKINGS
DESIGNER RANKINGS
WORLD DESIGN RANKINGS
DESIGN CLASSIFICATIONS
POPULAR DESIGNERS

CORPORATE
GET INVOLVED
SPONSOR AN AWARD
BENEFITS FOR SPONSORS

PRESS
DOWNLOADS
PRESS-KITS
PRESS PORTAL
LIST OF WINNERS
PUBLICATIONS
RANKINGS
CALL FOR ENTRIES
RESULTS ANNOUNCEMENT

CONTACT US
CONTACT US
GET SUPPORT

Follow us : Twitter Twitter | Twitter Facebook | Twitter Google+.
Share |