Profile: Espinosa Arts and Design

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About Espinosa Arts and Design : IN ORDER to fully appreciate the works of artist Clifford Espinosa and his team of dedicated craftsmen, one must understand his artistic philosophy and the driving force behind his every creation:

“Liberate the art from the artist.”

Espinosa sees himself not as a designer who meticulously plans every space, corner, and detail of his works—but, rather, as a mediator who converses with his medium, seeking to understand the intentions behind the material and then unearthing and revealing them—layer by layer, block by block—through months of painstaking, laborious, and dedicated sandpapering, polishing, chipping, chopping, assembling, and reworking.

If Espinosa’s works have both earthly and ethereal qualities about them, it’s because the artist approaches his work as a monk does meditation and yoga. He directs himself and his work toward the integration of structure (the “body”), utility (“the mind”), and aesthetics (“the heart and soul”)—with heavy doses of discipline, patience, commitment, and centeredness—and without hurrying anything into being.

“Art is not self-expression,” Espinosa shares of his own creative philosophy. “Art is about uncovering and revealing an object’s own powers... You pull out everything that is good and true about the object, liberating art from the artist.”

When dealing with wood, his primary medium and an expression of his deep ties with Mother Earth and social issues, Espinosa says that he doesn’t force something into becoming a shape or a form that it refuses to become. “I won’t force it to straighten if it doesn’t want to be straight,” the artist says. “I allow the material’s innate qualities and capacities to come out—which then merge with the physical capabilities of our craftsmen, to reveal the result of a collective piece of work.”

“When you liberate art from the artist, you create new art and things,” Espinosa emphasizes. “When the artist limits himself or herself, he or she isn’t able to create as much. The creation process slows down.”

“This is why I don’t think about what to create,” he points out. “The flow of my creative process starts out like a trickle and ends up like a storm of rushing water. It happens on its own. It is a product of serendipity; it is not rushed or forced.”

In managing his team of craftsmen, Espinosa likens himself to an orchestral director or a conductor. He trains each

one on the critical fundamentals of his instrument and on the essentials of his craft, then lets each one loose to learn, create, and “make mistakes”—just as his maestro before him, Jerusalino “Jerry” Araos, had done. He also treats his people as family, “like brothers” and like the artistic guilds of old, who made sure to care for their own.

“Social art is a common effort,” Espinosa points out. “We are like a group that cannot play out of tune. Everyone must be in sync, in harmony. I’m just like their orchestral director.”

Espinosa also talks about “magic”—in managing people, in allowing this medium and his materials to speak for themselves, and in that final moment of revelation.

“You know you’ve created and revealed something beautiful when it leaves you speechless—when you can no longer react because of sheer awe.”

“You know ‘this is it’—this is the moment—when it’s no longer the mind who decides,” Espinosa says of that moment of completion. “It feels sacred because our people give their whole hearts to the process. It’s a matter of life and death for them.”

For Clifford Espinosa, the artist, who has “died” and evolved many times over for his art and craft, his work is an act of transcendence that goes beyond material, structure, form, and even the artist’s own intentions. It is an ongoing process of transformation—reshaping himself, his craftsmen, his art itself—and, he hopes, the world around him.

He quotes his late master, Araos, who used these words to convince the young Espinosa to leave the protest actions and instead use art as his mouthpiece for change: “If we can create the beautiful world that you want, here and now, isn’t that enough?”

Perhaps it was enough then. For Espinosa today, however, art is only the starting point of a grander mission to restore balance and harmony to society. In sharing more of his work to the world, he hopes to spark even more conversations about how we can liberate ourselves from the very structures that limit us—reimagining, instead, how we can create new forms of being, doing, and living.
STATEMENT OF ART:
Art is not self expression unlike what others seem to know. It is the articulation of things and not of oneself. You express your opinion through art but that doesn’t mean it is a reflection of you and how you feel. Art is the interpretation of the artist to his surrounding environment. Art and design goes hand in hand. More than being aesthetically pleasing, art and design are elegantly formed to solve problems of both human and nature.

“Liberate the Art from the Artist”-Art is about uncovering and revealing an object’s own powers... You pull out everything that is good and true about the object, liberating art from the artist.

When you liberate art from the artist, you create new art and things. When the artist limits himself or herself, he or she isn’t able to create as much. The creation process slows down. This is why I don’t think about what to create. The flow of my creative process starts out like a trickle and ends up like a storm of rushing water. It happens on its own. It is a product of serendipity; it is not rushed or forced.

Art pieces must be both aesthetically pleasing and intend to satisfy the human needs for a more comfortable lifestyle. Modern technology, natural wooden materials and traditional craftsmanship are fused together to design one intricately-made masterpiece.

“You know you’ve created and revealed something beautiful when it leaves you speechless—when you can no longer react because of sheer awe.”

ORGANIZATION:
Espinosa Arts and Design

NON-DESIGN OCCUPATION:
Artist, painter Media, graphic, printing, culture, design

EDUCATION:
1987, Architecture, University of the Philippines

EXPERIENCE:
1987-1988-Foreman, designer, Supervisor, Tondo Housing Project, Philippines-
1988-1997-Architecture, Landscaping and Sculptures- Under the mentorship of Jerry Araos (one of the famous Filipino Sculptors)
1998-2012- Freelance Architect, Sculptor and Landscaper
2012-present- Managing Partner, Design and Research Director of Espinosa Arts and Design
2013-present- Principal Designer of Arkitropik

PRIVATE EXHIBITIONS:
1994, "Tagbuklod", First Solo Exhibit, Vargas Museum,Philippines

MIXED EXHIBITIONS:
1995, Group Exhibit, La Galerie-Alliance Francaise, "Tagbuklod Exhibit in Las Pinas", Philippines
1995, Trade Exhibit, Designer's Hall-PICC, Philippines
1996, Guest Exhibitor, GSIS Museum of Contemporary Arts Opening, Philippines
1996, "CRAFT IN ART", Group Exhibit, La Galerie-Alliance Francaise, Philippines
1997, "Eto na ang SALAKAI", Metropolitan Museum, Philippines
1998, "Philippine Centennial Celebration", Intramuros, Manila
1999, "100 Chairs in 100 Years", Featuring Miniature Copies of Chairs Around the World, Guest Exhibitor (One of 10 Sculptors, Exhibited is ergonomic Chair), Philippines
2004, "Writers' Night", University of the Philippines, Diliman, Philippines
2006, "Book Art", Imacron Bldg., Quezon City, Philippines
2006, World Piano Competition, Trophy Design and Exhibit, Insular Life Bldg. Alabang, Philippines
2012, "Manila Art", SMX MOA, Philippines
2012, Ännual Sculptural Show, Megamall, Philippines
2013, Ännual Sculptural Show, Megamall, Philippines
2016, International Furniture Fair Singapore, Singapore
Other Philippine Art Exhibits

PRESS APPEARANCES:
1995, "Of Dark Wood and Pastel Dreams", Manila Times, March, MANILA
1995, "Filipino Sculptor Colors Humanity", Asian Sculpture News Magazine, September, ASIA
1997, "Beautiful Playthings", The Philippine Star Newspaper, July, MANILA
2002, "His Life's Creations", Baby Magazine, January, PHILIPPINES
2005, "We live in eco-friendly, space-wise homes", Good Housekeeping Magazine, April, MANILA
2005, "Want to build and efficient home?", Good Housekeeping Magazine, April, MANILA
2006, "Book Art", by Alice Guillermo, Business Mirror Newspaper, April, MANILA
2006, "Filipino Sculpture", by Alice Guillermo, Business Mirror Newspaper, November, MANILA
2006, "World Meets Fashion",HighLife Magazine-Business World, December, MANILA
2007, Ïnaguration of the Smokey Mountain Resouce Recovery Facility", ADB, http://adb.org/Documents/Speeches/2007/sp2007020.a
sp, May, Manila
2007, "Smokey Mountain: Hope Springs from former dump", Philippine Daily Inquirer Newspaper, June, MANILA
2007, "Building Breathing Spaces", Malaya, October, Philippines
2007, "The House on M. Viola Street", PCIJ Blog, http://pcij.org/stories/the-house-on-m-viola-stree
t/, October, Manila
2008, "Bahay Kubo Principles form core of green architecture", ABS-CBN News Online, http://www.abs-cbnnews.com/special-report/07/07/08
/bahay-kubo-principles-form-core-green-architectur
e July, MANILA
2008, "Seeing Green", Casita Ysabel Resort, Highlife Magazine, August, Philippines
2009, "The Green Spirit", Business Mirror, September, Philippines
2009, "Responsible Retreat", Homestyle, July-August, Philippines
2009, "The Greening of Malate Church", Homestyle, November-December, Manila
2010, "How Green is your house?", by Roderick L. Abad, Business Mirror, January, Philippines
2010, "Reacting to Climate Change", ACFJ, http://acfj.ateneo.edu/magazine%20_flip.swf, April, Manila
2010, "Reacting to Climate Change", China Daily, http://www.chinadaily.co.cn/video/2010-04/22/conte
nt_9761475.htm, April, China
2010, "Rehumanizing Design"by Matthew Arcilla, Homestyle, May-June, Manila Philippines
2011, "Living in he moment", Luxe Magazine, March-May, Philippines

MEMBERSHIPS & ASSOCIATIONS:
1986,University of the Philippines Task Force Arki, Philippines

COLLECTIONS:
National Museum of the Philippines, Philippines

HOBBIES:
Setting up my Volkswagen Beetle, Landscaping, Karaoke, Travelling

WEB SITE:
eade.strikingly.com

PORTFOLIO URL:
eade.strikingly.com

RSS URL:
eade.strikingly.com

REGISTRATION DATE:
2016-03-30 04:10:29

COUNTRY:
Philippines

ACCOUNT TYPE:
Start-Up

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